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My specialty is neuroscience and physiology, but I love all sciences, athletics, healthy food and fun people.

I love interaction and scientific dicussion. Never be afraid to ask me questions. I may not have the answer, but I'll be damned if I haven't learned how to do a good, quick Google Scholar search to find out.

In addition I like to look at non-science related cute animal pictures, art and funny comics too :)

Hope you enjoy my blog but please, feel free to leave suggestions for improvement!
THIS IS TERRIFYING…yet strangely fascinating
From Relax. I’m an Entomologist
Centipede Bursts from Snake’s StomachDon’t mess with Scolopendrahttp://www.livescience.com/44878-centipede-bursts-from-snakes-stomach.htmlImage Credit: Arsovski et al Ecologica Montenegrina

THIS IS TERRIFYING…yet strangely fascinating

From Relax. I’m an Entomologist

Centipede Bursts from Snake’s Stomach
Don’t mess with Scolopendra

http://www.livescience.com/44878-centipede-bursts-from-snakes-stomach.html

Image Credit: Arsovski et al Ecologica Montenegrina

mucholderthen:

MEASLES VIRION

[top] Thin-section transmission electron micrograph (TEM)

This TEM reveals the ultrastructural appearance of a single virus particle, or “virion”, of measles virus. The measles virus is a paramyxovirus, of the genus Morbillivirus. It is 100-200 nm in diameter, with a core of single-stranded RNA, and is closely related to the rinderpest and canine distemper viruses.   [Source]

[bottom]  Image: Pasieka/Science Photo Library 
               Via New Scientist






To quote an actual event from an actual friend

"An example of how ridiculous cars can be… My car stopped working because it needed to be "burped"





No you didn’t read that wrong.”


Why would this be?

"An air pocket in the cooling system causes the thermostat to remain shut and overheats the system in minutes. To burp it you have to open the top hose (or vent valve if the car should have a more sophisticated setup) and continually top off while squeezing the hoses to work out the pocket of air. Once coolant hits the thermostat it will open and resume functioning properly."


Cars a crazy stuff. Learn more about the cooling system at:
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/cooling-system.htm
To quote an actual event from an actual friend
"An example of how ridiculous cars can be… My car stopped working because it needed to be "burped"

No you didn’t read that wrong.”

Why would this be?

"An air pocket in the cooling system causes the thermostat to remain shut and overheats the system in minutes. To burp it you have to open the top hose (or vent valve if the car should have a more sophisticated setup) and continually top off while squeezing the hoses to work out the pocket of air. Once coolant hits the thermostat it will open and resume functioning properly."

Cars a crazy stuff. Learn more about the cooling system at:

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/cooling-system.htm


From I fucking love biodiversity






The hammer headed bat is a megabat of equatorial Africa. More than half of the male body is its larynx which allows him to sing to attract females.More info: http://n.pr/1exNRNq©David Higgins

From I fucking love biodiversity

The hammer headed bat is a megabat of equatorial Africa. More than half of the male body is its larynx which allows him to sing to attract females.

More info: http://n.pr/1exNRNq
©David Higgins


In the discussion of recent events in the news, some colleagues and I made mention of the recent advances in artificial blood cells, stem cell vaginas and esophagus tissue.

One colleague summed the conversation quite fabulously:

"Limitless blood and vaginas, what more do you need? "


“Have Herpes, Will Travel
Insight into the geographical clustering of a viral genome comes from an unexpected source.”
By Abby Olena | April 1, 2014

“Charles Grose, a virologist at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, was perusing the advance online literature last November when a paper about the genetic diversity of the virus that causes oral herpes—herpes simplex virus 1, or HSV-1—rang a bell (J Virol, 88:1209–27, 2014). Grose was particularly struck by a diagram depicting the geographic clustering of HSV-1 genomes.
The figure compared 26 HSV-1 genome sequences and depicted nearly all of them as being most closely related to strains from the same region of the world. Five of the viral strains isolated in North America and Europe clustered together, but there was one outlier. A North American strain—KOS, named for its original source, virologist Kendall Owen Smith, who isolated the virus from himself in 1964 and shared it with colleagues until it became a common lab strain—clustered with HSV-1 strains from Asia.
The paper’s authors explained the anomaly in general terms as the effect of human travel or interactions, and first author Moriah Szpara of Pennsylvania State University says that she imagined a number of reasonable explanations—including that Smith could have married a woman from Asia. But Grose had a better explanation.”
Read the full story at: http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/39484/title/Have-Herpes—Will-Travel/

Have Herpes, Will Travel

Insight into the geographical clustering of a viral genome comes from an unexpected source.”

By Abby Olena | April 1, 2014

Charles Grose, a virologist at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, was perusing the advance online literature last November when a paper about the genetic diversity of the virus that causes oral herpes—herpes simplex virus 1, or HSV-1—rang a bell (J Virol, 88:1209–27, 2014). Grose was particularly struck by a diagram depicting the geographic clustering of HSV-1 genomes.

The figure compared 26 HSV-1 genome sequences and depicted nearly all of them as being most closely related to strains from the same region of the world. Five of the viral strains isolated in North America and Europe clustered together, but there was one outlier. A North American strain—KOS, named for its original source, virologist Kendall Owen Smith, who isolated the virus from himself in 1964 and shared it with colleagues until it became a common lab strain—clustered with HSV-1 strains from Asia.

The paper’s authors explained the anomaly in general terms as the effect of human travel or interactions, and first author Moriah Szpara of Pennsylvania State University says that she imagined a number of reasonable explanations—including that Smith could have married a woman from Asia. But Grose had a better explanation.”

Read the full story at: http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/39484/title/Have-Herpes—Will-Travel/


Very interesting way to look at it.


Source: Sean Rowan Laughlin
"me and my Lasiodora parahybana"
I’m thinking someone should start an attractive males and spiders blog.
Any volunteers?

Source: Sean Rowan Laughlin

"me and my Lasiodora parahybana"

I’m thinking someone should start an attractive males and spiders blog.

Any volunteers?


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